Quantcast

Categorized | News

Wonderful News from Nebraska State Senator Laura Ebke!

Here is a open letter of sorts from Libertarian state senator Laura Ebke, running in Nebraska.  She twitted it out.  If I were financially and time-wise able, I’d come help her.  Maybe I will…

Yes as you know, dear readers, I have written about and endorsed Senator Ebke and even GAVE HER MONEY (something I rarely do) and it looks like others also did so too:

A Local Race Being Watched Around the Country?

July 29, 2018In 2016, when I switched political parties to become a Libertarian, I really didn’t anticipate what I was unleashing. My move to the Libertarian Party wasn’t based on some sort of sudden change of philosophy. I ran in 2014 as a “smaller government conservative”, or a “libertarian conservative”– and that’s really how I still think of myself.

I have introduced bills that would completely eliminate some taxes (LB789 in 2018); bills which would significantly reduce inheritance taxes (LB 936 in 2016); bills that have passed which increase transparency and accountability in bonding (LB 132 in 2015).

I’ve introduced bills which would protect your 2nd Amendment Rights (LB 184 in 2015, and LB 289 in 2015).

And of course LB 299 in 2017/18 (which has been touted as something of a “national model” for other states), passed into law this past year, and seeks to reduce the government’s impact on individuals’ abilities to work. I also worked with a constituent in Lancaster County to pass (via amendment into the HHS priority bill) a law which now allows for mobile cosmetology and barber salons (LB 790 in 2018).

I have co-sponsored bills which would limit the ability of the state to violate your constitutional rights–including a bill (which passed) seeking to limit the ability of the state to seize assets without a conviction (LB 1106 in 20115).

In reviewing the bills that I’ve introduced and co-sponsored, I’ve not introduced or passed anything which would cost citizens more money (increase costs), and in some cases, my bills would actually decrease the tax burden on citizens. I’m proud of my record as a small government conservative, who has tried to protect your wallet, and your liberty.

As noted above, though, when I switched political parties–although it didn’t change my focus in the Legislature–the dynamics probably changed, and folks in the district will see some manifestations of those changes. Let me explain:

  1. I did not realize that this would be the case, but after I switched parties, I came to find out that I am now the “highest ranking elected Libertarian” in the country. Although our ballots for Legislature are non-partisan, this has brought more national attention to me and my 2018 race than I would have ever dreamed possible (or wanted). Some donors–who want to see the “highest ranking Libertarian” re-elected–have been very generous with their money; people from all over the country, who are individuals situated in such as way as to gain nothing from my re-election, aside from hoping to see positive election results.
  2. For many years, but certainly since 1992 and Ross Perot’s run for President, many have suggested that there is a need for more third party options–whether Libertarian or Green or Reform or something else–but because of ballot access issues created by the two major parties, it becomes exceedingly difficult for third parties to really get off the ground.
  • Think of it this way: You’re on a long road trip, and you’re getting hungry for a hamburger. You’d really like to find a Wendy’s, because their hamburgers are pretty good, and you can get a Frosty while you’re there. But at exit after exit, all you find are Burger King and McDonald’s. Eventually, you just resign yourself to taking what you can get, instead of what you want, and you buy a Whopper and a chocolate shake… Now there’s the market, of course; maybe the traffic isn’t adequate to support three fast food hamburger places along that stretch of road. But what if you found out that the reason Wendy’s didn’t come in was because a deal had been made with the zoning authorities that they would protect McDonald’s and Burger King from any other competition? At some level, that’s the political system that we see today: third parties–smaller parties–have trouble just jumping through the legal hoops to be given the opportunity to compete. And because of that, they often can’t and don’t.
  • There are currently 4 Libertarian members of state legislatures: 3 in New Hampshire (all in the lower house of their bicameral system), and myself. Only 2 of the fellows in New Hampshire are running for re-election. So, to put it all simply, in “big party world” where there are literally THOUSANDS of incumbent legislators and other elected officials running for re-election, the attention paid to any one race is going to be relatively small; in “third party world (e.g. Libertarian Party)”, when there are only 3 incumbents running for re-election in the whole country, people are paying attention to what happens to us.
  • That, of course, can be both a blessing and a curse. Fundraising is nice. But it also means that people from around the country want to come and help me in other ways.
  • The Young Americans for Liberty, for instance, have endorsed me, and will be sending a team of students in to knock on doors later in the fall. YAL is a 501c4, and so won’t (can’t) be directly coordinating efforts with my campaign, but some of you will undoubtedly see them around. I’m excited to have their support–no matter what happens. This is as fine a group of young people as I’ve seen engaged in politics in the last 40 years. These are young men and women who care about constitutional conservatism, and they’re willing to spend weeks of their time talking to folks at the door about it. Please recognize that these young men and women aren’t just “outsiders” (indeed, we don’t know where they’re coming in from–some may be from Nebraska)–they’re learning to work within a political environment that they’re going to take charge of in the near future. We should all be grateful that they are so actively engaged, I think, and I’m grateful that they are inspired enough by my campaign to come to work on my behalf.
  • I have had the honor to attend a number of national events–both Libertarian Party and Young Americans for Liberty. I’m a part of the National Liberty Coalition–a group of state legislators who work to advance liberty in their own states (the website is functional, but still under construction, so not yet fully formed–I am actually a new member to the group). Ironically–or because of the difficulty of ballot access in other states–I am the only actual Libertarian in the group–the rest are Republicans.
  • National media has picked up on the uniqueness of my race. I get questions like “do you think that Nebraskans would re-elect a Libertarian?” My answer is always that I believe that Nebraskans in LD 32 will re-elect me if I can convince them that I am still the person I was in 2014, if I can demonstrate that I’ve lived up to the principles that I espoused in 2014, and if I can show them that I’ve worked as a thoughtful leader in the Legislature who has tried to understand the issues, and represent my constituents honorably, even when I haven’t been able to represent the views of all of them, all of the time.

If you’ve gotten this far, thank you for reading this. Know that I would have quite preferred if this race had been a quiet one. But know also, that while I will also keep my head and my heart in the district, and serving YOU will be my priority as I attempt to represent my constituents responsibly, I also have new obligations. My race is important to a lot of people–from Massachusetts to Florida; from California to Texas. I owe it to them to give it my all to try and earn YOUR votes in November.

In between “official duties” as a committee chair who will be chairing around 10 different hearings and meetings in the next few months, I will be working to knock on many of your doors, and make myself available in our communities to talk and answer questions.

I am always willing to talk about any of this, to any one.  I’m happy to have coffee with you in your community, or talk with you on the phone. My cell number is below.  Leave a message if I don’t answer right away.

Best wishes,

Senator Laura Ebke
Telephone number omitted but easy to find!

P.S. At the Saline County Fair, several of you asked about upcoming debates in response to my challenge to my opponent several weeks ago. I have not had an affirmative response to my challenge yet, although I hope that one is forthcoming. I have started lining up locations for some of the earlier debates, on the assumption that we both want to give citizens maximum opportunity to hear from us.

Go Laura go!  How about some Lincolns for Laura for Liberty!

About Elwood Sanders

Elwood "Sandy" Sanders is a Hanover attorney who is an Appellate Procedure Consultant for Lantagne Legal Printing and has written ten scholarly legal articles. Sandy was also Virginia's first Appellate Defender and also helped bring curling in VA! (None of these titles imply any endorsement of Sanders’ views)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

Tom White Says:

Nothing is more conservative than a republican wanting to get their majority back. And nothing is more liberal than a republican WITH a majority.

Check out NewsMax!

Sign up for Virginia Right Once Daily Email Digest

No Spam - ever! We send a daily email with the posts of the previous day. Unsubscribe at any time.
* = required field

Submit a Blog Post!

Submit a Blog Post for our 'Boots on the Ground' feature

Click Here for Instructions on How to Submit a Post

Google Ad

Google Ad

Follow Us Anywhere!

Google Ad

Archives

%d bloggers like this: